News

Actions

Belgrade snow plow drivers digging increase of business due to heavy snow

Posted at 2:45 PM, Mar 01, 2019
and last updated 2019-03-01 18:13:51-05

BELGRADE – Most of us are seeing the recent heavy snowfall as a pain in the back, but some people are seeing dollar signs.

Local snow plow drivers from private companies to one-man efforts are getting busier as the snow piles get higher.

To small, private snow removal services, snow like this means a constant flow of helping people dig out their driveways and sidewalks.

Snowfall like what we’ve seen this week has them working even harder.

“It’s exciting,” says Matt Taylor, who lives and drives a side-by-side snow plow in Belgrade. “That’s why you live in Montana.”

It’s a sight that slows down many but, for plow operators like Taylor, it means good business.

“It just means dollar signs, I guess,” Taylor says. “Tons of snow, tons of work. I’ve helped all of my neighbors plow out their driveways, the sidewalks and everything else.”

Taylor says while his service is new, calls started coming in as his neighbors’ driveways began to disappear.

“People are calling and just always looking for somebody to pull their car out,” Taylor says. “It’s what I’ve been wanting to do. I’m going to put a website together and start plowing here soon.”

For even new drivers, like Taylor in Belgrade, they say this dump of snow means the same thing. But they have a few things they want you to keep in mind while they do their work.

“I don’t look behind me too often so watch out,” says Mike Barner.

Barner, a long-time resident of Belgrade, says he’s volunteered his quad to help his neighbors get out of their homes.

No pay — same mission.

“This is beautiful,” Barner says. “This is lightweight stuff so I can move it. If it was heavy snow, it would only be this deep instead of this deep.”

Either way, as business goes up, those like Matt and Mike say they are keeping up the pace just to help.

“I grew up in Montana and that’s what we do.”

Again, Barner says he plows out his neighbors and anyone around his home voluntarily, without pay.

He adds if you see someone out plowing, watch out for them to make sure they stay safe while they are doing their good deeds.