NewsUS News

Actions

Earthquake recorded near Iceland volcano that has been erupting for a month

Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Iceland Volcano
Posted at 1:55 PM, Apr 21, 2021
and last updated 2021-04-21 15:59:14-04

REYKJAVIK, Iceland — A 4.1 magnitude quake has struck in Iceland Tuesday night near a rare Icelandic volcano that started erupting on March 19.

The volcano in the Fagradalsfjall mountains is about 20 miles from Iceland's capital Reykjavik.

The long-dormant volcano is the area's first eruption in nearly 800 years.

There does not appear to be any damage from the quake, and scientists think it was caused by the weeks-long eruption.

“In simple terms, Iceland is one big volcano," Thorvaldur Thordarson, professor of volcanology at the University of Iceland, told The Guardian.

Iceland Volcano
Lava flows from a new fissure on a volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwestern Iceland, Monday, April 5, 2021. The new fissure has opened up at the Icelandic volcano that began erupting last month, prompting the evacuation of hundreds of hikers who had come to see the spectacle. Officials say the new fissure is about 500 meters (550 yards) long and about one kilometer (around a half-mile) from the original eruption site in the Geldinga Valley (AP Photo/Marco Di Marco)

What makes this eruption rare, other than the location, is how accessible it is.

“It’s very approachable, people can get reasonably close and still be safe,” said Thordarson.

More than 45,000 people have flocked to the remote site to see the rare volcanic eruption among the snow and ice.

Iceland Volcano
Steam and lava spurt from a new fissure on a volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwestern Iceland, Monday, April 5, 2021. The new fissure has opened up at the Icelandic volcano that began erupting last month, prompting the evacuation of hundreds of hikers who had come to see the spectacle. Officials say the new fissure is about 500 meters (550 yards) long and about one kilometer (around a half-mile) from the original eruption site in the Geldinga Valley (AP Photo/Marco Di Marco)

He says this eruption is "very quiet," with a low probability of a big explosion. Rather, the lava just continues to flow.

Thordarson thinks the volcano could continue "for some time, maybe years, but there is no guarantee."