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New documentary aims to shine light on Beattie Gulch bison hunt

“It’s my legacy,” said Bonnie Lynn. “I ask the Lord, why was I allowed that precious land in my lifetime? The answer is clear—to be a voice for these animals who cannot speak.”
Posted at 8:03 AM, Nov 08, 2023
and last updated 2023-11-08 10:03:41-05

Bonnie Lynn says it’s a horror show she’s had to watch for years: hundreds of bison gunned down near her Gardiner home as they leave Yellowstone National Park at Beattie Gulch in search of food. Last year alone, more than a thousand bison were killed there by hunters.

“It’s a sad situation not just for Yellowstone and the bison, it’s sad for the tribes, for the state of Montana and now, we have the chance to turn it around,” said Lynn.

Lynn has been at the forefront of the Beattie Gulch bison issue for about a decade, raising awareness and seeking change.

“It’s my legacy,” she said. “I ask the Lord, why was I allowed that precious land in my lifetime? The answer is clear—to be a voice for these animals who cannot speak.”

And finally, she feels her voice is being heard thanks to the release of the Yellowstone Voices documentary.

“The public does not know the complicated, true bison story,” said Lynn.

Lynn says the 45-minute documentary will shed light on the Yellowstone ecosystem being affected.

“By this symbol of freedom which is our majestic national mammal,” said Lynn.

“I’m one small voice,” she added. “We need voices and I’m looking forward to better management and respect for our national mammal.”

A free screening of Yellowstone Voices takes place Nov. 9 at the Museum of the Rockies. You can learn more about the documentary at the Yellowstone Voices website.