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A Stormy Stretch Ahead

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Posted at 5:30 PM, May 13, 2024
and last updated 2024-05-13 20:09:04-04

Scattered showers and thunderstorms hit parts of Montana on Monday but some places had dry weather. There will be more widespread wet weather for the state on Tuesday. Showers and thunderstorms will not wait until the afternoon. Some areas like Great Falls, Lewistown and Helena will have wet weather and mostly cloudy skies through the morning. As clouds break up a little, instability will increase allowing for more showers and thunderstorms to develop through the afternoon and evening. It will be one of those days that go shower, storm, sun, shower, storm, sun, repeat. Some storms will have brief heavy rain and small hail. Highs will be cooler in the 50s and 60s with a northwest wind up to 10-20mph. Wednesday will be a quieter day with partly cloudy to mostly sunny conditions. West wind will be between 10-20mph. Highs will be warmer in the 60s and 70s. Most of Thursday looks good for most of the state but the next storm will start to throw clouds and a few showers up on the Hi-Line late in the day. Highs will be in the 70s. A cold front will move through on Friday with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Highs will range from the 50s west, to the 60s in central Montana, to the 70s in the eastern part of the state. Colder air will move in through the day with snow levels dropping to near 6000' by late in the afternoon. Any accumulation will be confined to the higher terrain. Saturday will be a cool, showery and windy day. Highs will be in then 50s and 60s. There will be more wet weather over eastern Montana. It's the wettest time of year and we need this moisture after the drier than normal winter.

Curtis Grevenitz
Chief Meteorologist