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More Tropical Moisture on Wildfires

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Posted at 5:32 PM, Aug 21, 2023
and last updated 2023-08-21 20:28:48-04

A FLOOD WATCH continues for northwest Montana.
A HIGH WIND WARNING continues for southwest Montana.
A WIND ADVISORY continues for parts of Powell, Silver Bow and Granite Counties.

Moisture from what was Hurricane Hilary and the monsoon will continue to impact Montana through the middle of the week. Over the weekend, cooler temperatures and significant rain for some areas (including over most wildfires) really helped the fire situation. Rain continues for western Montana into Tuesday, but scattered storms will affect the state through Tuesday and Wednesday. More moisture will fall over drought and wildfire stricken western Montana. Tuesday will be mostly sunny to start and very humid. Moisture from what was Hilary and the monsoon will work through the state. However, the precipitation will not be the steady light rain that fell over the weekend into Monday. Thunderstorms will develop that could produce heavy downpours, strong wind and large hail. There is still a lot of moisture and energy in the atmosphere capable of producing isolated severe thunderstorms. Highs will be warmer in the 70s and 80s. Wednesday will be similar with scattered afternoon and evening thunderstorms. Highs will be in the 70s and 80s. A cold front will move through Montana Wednesday night, setting the state up for a beautiful day on Thursday. Skies will be sunny, the humidity will be much lower, and highs will be in the 70s to around 80. Friday will be a beautiful summer day too with highs in the low to mid 80s. This coming weekend will be much warmer and drier than the last. Highs will climb back up into the 80s to around 90. A few isolated storms are possible both Saturday and Sunday.

After all of this recent rain, the fire danger has been temporarily lowered. Most of the fires have had significant rainfall, allowing firefighters to get more control. However, fire season is not over with yet.

Curtis Grevenitz
Chief Meteorologist