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One of the Most Dangerous Severe Weather Days of the Year

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Posted at 5:25 PM, Jun 26, 2024

I am fairly confident in at least one tornado forming in the state Thursday among several severe storms capable of producing large hail and damaging wind. Most of this intense thunderstorm activity will be in eastern Montana, but a few strong to severe storms will rock Helena and Great Falls in the morning hours. A strong cold front will move through on Thursday with rain and thunderstorms in western Montana through the morning. Large hail, downpours and damaging wind is possible. As the cold front moves east and temperatures warm ahead of the front across central and eastern Montana, the thunderstorms will intensify through the afternoon and evening. Hail greater than 2" diameter and wind speeds in excess of 75mph are possible. There is also a higher risk of a tornado across far eastern Montana. High temperatures will range from the 80s east, to the 70s central, to the 60s farther west. Strong west wind on Thursday afternoon could gust up to 40-50mph. Friday will be a rainy day for the Hi-Line and central Montana. A little snow will fall up on the Rocky Mountain Front and Glacier National Park. A few showers or a thunderstorm are possible around Helena. Highs will be in the 60s and 70s, a cooler late June day. Strong west to northwest wind will once again howl. This final weekend of June will start off dry, sunny and comfortable with highs in the 70s to around 80. Sunday will feature the return of scattered showers and thunderstorms, and some of that moisture will linger into Monday. Most of next week including July 4th will have scattered thunderstorms and cooler than average temperatures.

Make sure to be aware and stay tuned for updates on the incoming storm.

Be safe,
Curtis Grevenitz
Chief Meteorologist