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Plethora of Precipitation Across the West

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Posted at 5:52 PM, Oct 18, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-18 20:49:21-04

The Pacific is about to open up as a series of storms move into the West. A significant amount of rain and mountain snow will fall across a significant portion of the West, bringing many areas closer to the end of fire season. However, this pattern will initially favor west of the Continental Divide and much of Montana will be dry into the weekend. While there will be some snow in the mountains and rain showers west of the Divide here in Montana, many areas east will have to wait a little while. The active pattern should continue through the end of October with more of Montana seeing an opportunity for rain and higher elevation snow. Tuesday will start out with cloudy skies for most areas but little precipitation as a storm system moves through the central Rockies. Besides a few snow showers down near the border of Wyoming, most of Montana will be dry. Sunshine will increase through late morning and afternoon. Temperatures will be cool in the 40s and 50s. Wednesday will start out sunny but clouds will increase through the day. Highs will be in the 50s to around 60. Thursday will be a mostly sunny and mild day with highs in the 60s for many towns. West winds could gust as high as 30mph. Clouds will increase again on Friday but there will be little more than an isolated shower late in the day over the western mountains. Saturday will be mostly cloudy with highs in the 60s. A few showers will move through late in the evening. Sunday and Monday will have a better chance for showers and mountain snow east of the Continental Divide. More moisture will move through in the final week of October. Temperatures also will cool down to well below average by the middle of next week.

Curtis Grevenitz
Chief Meteorologist