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Snow Water Equivalents Are NOT Typos

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Posted at 5:10 PM, Jun 15, 2022
and last updated 2022-06-15 19:20:27-04

A FLOOD WARNING is in effect for the Yellowstone River.

Yes, the snow-water equivalent for the Smith, Musselshell, Judith and Bitterroot Rivers are over 2000% of normal. Snow-Water equivalent is way above normal in all of Montana's mountains. However, to put things into a little perspective, it is the middle of June. Many areas in the mountains typically have little to no snow on the ground at this time. So an area with a foot or two of snow on the ground where there typically is not will produce outrageous percentages. BUT, this is still a sign that there is more snowpack and potential water in the mountains than normal. With a rise in temperatures over the next few days, more snow will be melting. Flooding is still a possibility for some of our rivers and creeks through the weekend. Thursday will be a much needed beautiful day across the state. Highs will be in the 70s to around 80 under mostly sunny skies. It will be a day to clean up and catch your breath before the next round of weather moves in. Friday will be a summer scorcher as temperatures warm into the 80s and 90s, with a few 100s in eastern Montana. This will be the hottest day so far in 2022. Hot temperatures will melt more mountain snow, so fast moving cold water will continue in most rivers and creeks. A few isolated thunderstorms will develop late on Friday. The heat and thunderstorm threat will continue this weekend. Highs on Saturday will range from the 70s and 80s west, to the 90s and 100s east. Isolated thunderstorms will develop Saturday afternoon and evening. Sunday will have more scattered thunderstorms with cooler highs in the 70s and 80s. Monday will be cooler with widespread showers and strong wind. Highs will be back down in the 50s, 60s and 70s.

Curtis Grevenitz
Chief Meteorologist